Located in one of the most beautiful areas of Southeast Arizona,
Sonoita Creek is a gift to the animals, plants and people who live there.

Research, Restore, Educate & Collaborate

Founded in 2004, Friends of Sonoita Creek (FOSC) works to protect and restore the water and natural habitat of Sonoita Creek and its watershed. We inform residents and visitors about the importance of Sonoita Creek to life forms and its relationship to the geography through hands-on activities, presentations, hikes, and financial support to kindred organizations.

Sonoita Creek flows a distance of 30 miles, above and below ground, southwest from Sonoita into the Santa Cruz River north of Nogales. The watershed drains 258 square miles, has unique geological features, seven biomes with a great diversity of plant and animal species, and vast natural beauty.

It is a cultural crossroads with protected ancient archaeology sites, a Spanish colonial past, and mining, ranching and railroad history.

 

 

FOSC is a non-profit organization and your donations are tax deductible.

 


Volunteer Opportunities -- Join Us

Water Quality Sampling
Wed, Oct. 26 -- 8:00 a.m. Paton Center
Wed, Nov. 30 -- 8:00 a.m. Paton Center
Water quality sampling gives insights into natural impacts and impacts to the environment caused by human activity of upstream land and water uses, documenting potential changes over time.

Wet/Dry Mapping
Sat, Dec. 3   Harshaw Creek -- 8:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m
Sun, Dec. 4  Sonoita Creek -- 8:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m 
Wet-Dry mapping seeks to precisely locate where above ground water is flowing in order to better understand future impacts on the creek over time.

To participate or for more information contact us at sonoitacreek@gmail.com

Letter Writing Campaign

Thanks for participating in the Letter Writing Campaign to remove cattle from the Important Birding Area at Patagonia Lake.  We are happy to report that two grazing leases have been revoked and the State has no plans to renew the leases in the future. Read about it in the Patagonia Regional Times.

Read more about restoration issues for this critical reach of Sonoita Creek in our Fall newsletter.